Delta IV Heavy Booster Cores Arrive for Parker Solar Probe

Framed by a series of cabbage palms, a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy common booster core is transported by truck to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 37 Horizontal Processing Facility after arriving at Port Canaveral. The Delta IV Heavy will launch NASA’s upcoming Parker Solar Probe mission.
The mission will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection. Liftoff atop the Delta IV Heavy rocket is scheduled to take place from Cape Canaveral’s Space Launch Complex 37 in summer 2018.

Launch preparations are beginning to get off the ground for NASA’s upcoming Parker Solar Probe mission, scheduled to lift off in summer 2018 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket.

Two of the three common booster cores comprising the rocket’s first stage have arrived on the company’s Mariner ship, which delivered the components to Port Canaveral in Florida. From there the cores were offloaded and transported to the Horizontal Processing Facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 37.

The Parker Solar Probe will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection.

Van Allen Probes Surf through Waves in Space

The two populations of hiss, low and high frequency, inhabit two separate regions in near-Earth space.
Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith

The space surrounding our planet is full of restless charged particles and roiling electric and magnetic fields, which create waves around Earth. One type of wave, plasmaspheric hiss, is particularly important for removing charged particles from the Van Allen radiation belts, a seething coil of particles encircling Earth, which can interfere with satellites and telecommunications. A new study published in Journal of Geophysical Research using data from NASA’s Van Allen Probes spacecraft has discovered that hiss is more complex than previously understood.

The new study looked at a newly identified population of hiss waves at a lower frequency than usually studied. These low-frequency hiss waves are particularly good at cleaning out high-energy particles — those that can cause damage to satellites — from the radiation belts. The authors of the study noticed that low-frequency waves are actually a separate and unique population, tending to cluster in different regions around Earth compared to their high-frequency counterparts.

The complete article is found here.

ICON Payload Integration TimeLapse

This time-lapse video shows the integration of instruments into the ICON payload at the Space Dynamics Laboratory in Logan, Utah. The video covers a 15-week period from mid-February, 2016 until the end of May, 2016. Occasional darkness indicates cleanliness inspections using a UV light, and the blue tower that is occasionally visible is the last tracker used for alignment measurements. The video begins with preparation of the Payload Interface Plate (PIP), with purge lines and the MIGHTI fiber optic assembly. The order of instrument integration is as follows: MIGHTI B, MIGHTI A, ICP-Echo, MIGHTI cal lamp, MIGHTI ebox, IVM A, EUV, FUV, IVM B, star tracker and antenna mast simulators, and ICP flight. The video ends with the payload moved from the handling cart to the shipping container base, ready for testing.

2017 Novato Space Festival

Mark your calendars for the Annual Novato Space Festival, Sunday August 6th, from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Meet legendary Astronauts from the Apollo, Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs.

NEW THIS YEAR…
EARLY ENTRANCE at 9:30am for families with CHILDREN 12 & UNDER
You’ll get to browse the exhibit area first,
THEN you’ll get to meet Astronaut Jerry Ross and he will read to you from his children’s book!

Making of ICON

Data coming back from orbit seemed to not make sense. The glow at the equator changed from place to place around the Earth in ways we didn’t expect. Now we are building the ICON mission, a satellite that will explore this region of the atmosphere, where Earth’s weather meets space weather…It really takes a huge number of people working together to make a space science mission.