STEREO-A Spacecraft Returns Data From the Far Side of the Sun

Image Credit: NASA/STEREO

Image Credit: NASA/STEREO

This image of the sun was taken on July 15, 2015, with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager onboard NASA’s Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft, which collects images in several wavelengths of light that are invisible to the human eye. This image shows the sun in wavelengths of 171 angstroms, which are typically colorized in blue. STEREO-A has been on the far side of the sun since March 24, where it had to operate in safe mode, collecting and saving data from its radio instrument. The first images in over three months were received from STEREO-A on July 11.

The rest of the Article is courtesy of NASA Image of the Day

 

MAVEN‬ is in its third “Deep Dip Campaign”

(Image credit: Lockheed Martin)

(Image credit: Lockheed Martin)

MAVEN has started its third deep-dip campaign

The MAVEN spacecraft has successfully begun its third deep-dip campaign of the mission. On Tuesday, July 7th, the ‪#‎MAVEN‬ navigation team executed a maneuver to lower periapsis by 24 km down to 123 km above the surface of ‪#‎Mars‬. At this altitude, Mars’ atmospheric density is currently 1.9 kg/km³. A second maneuver will place the #MAVEN spacecraft into the center of the target density corridor.

The MAVEN “deep dip” campaigns will provide data from the boundary where Mars’ upper and lower atmospheres meet—also referred to as the “homopause”—enabling the spacecraft to sample the entire upper atmosphere of Mars.

(Image credit: NASA)

(Image credit: NASA)

Deep-dip #3 continues to go well

The ‪#‎MAVEN‬ spacecraft is well within the target atmospheric density corridor for our third deep-dip campaign, with a periapsis near 120 km (75 miles) above the surface of Mars.

All spacecraft systems and instruments are performing nominally, although we do not expect to have results from the campaign until the spacecraft has exited the deep-dip.

11717319_10153628948407868_3525870588043417085_o

(Image credit: NASA/GSFC)

Analysis by the #MAVEN navigation team shows that the spacecraft is still within the targeted atmospheric deep-dip corridor.

As a result, no maneuver has been made to adjust the location of the spacecraft within the corridor since the beginning of deep-dip #3. The density of ‪#‎Mars‬‘ atmosphere at periapsis is decreasing slightly with time, as predicted by some of the models. At this rate, we may have to perform a maneuver to keep MAVEN within the density corridor before the “walkout” to resume normal science operations mid-week.

2015 Novato Space Festival

2015-SpaceFest-2-web

If you are a fan of space flight, NASA, and space exploration in general, mark your Calendar for Saturday August 1st and come out to the 2015 Novato Space Festival.

Meet Legendary Astronauts. See the latest additions to the museum, A Lunar Excursion Module (LEM): this is a 90% scale mockup, A Lunar Rover: this is an exact replica of one of the moon buggies, and A Space Capsule: This Gemini Capsule Boilerplate was used for parachute tests in 1963. There are many other items to see and astronauts to meet.

For more information, check out the website:

NuSTAR sees the most energetic spots on our sun!

NuSTAR Sun

Flaring, active regions of our sun are highlighted in this new image combining observations from several telescopes. High-energy X-rays from NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) are shown in blue; low-energy X-rays from Japan’s Hinode spacecraft are green; and extreme ultraviolet light from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is yellow and red. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/JAXA

This stunning image captured by our NuSTAR Satellite combines observations from several telescopes to show us various active regions on the sun. The high-energy X-rays are shown in blue, while green represents lower-energy X-rays. While this satellite usually investigates black holes and other high-energy objects, it can also be used to uncover some of the sun’s mysteries. More: 

Exploring Ancient and Modern Mars with the MAVEN and the MSL Missions

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In his presentation from June 21, 2015, Dr. Paul Mahaffy, planetary scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and instrument lead for the MAVEN NGIMS and the Mars Science Laboratory SAM instruments, focuses on current and past measurements of isotopes and volatile gases in the Martian surface and atmosphere during the final day of the 2015 MAVEN New Media Professional Development Workshop.

During the presentation and discussion, Dr. Mahaffy demonstrates the compelling case that NASA’s Mars missions are making for long-lasting water on the surface of the Red Planet and what that means for potential past and present habitability.

View all of the videos from the workshop in one playlist, here:

(Video credit: Tom Mason/University of Colorado Boulder-LASP)

Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
NASA Goddard
NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover

‪#‎MAVENnm‬

NuSTAR – “biggest and baddest” black holes are actually buried under thick blankets of gas and dust

NuSTAR Discovery

A montage of images showing an artist’s concept of NuSTAR (top); a color image of one of the galaxies targeted by NuSTAR (lower left); and artist’s concept of a hidden black hole. Credits: Top: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Lower-left: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA. Bottom-right: NASA/ESA

Did you know that some of the “biggest and baddest” black holes are actually buried under thick blankets of gas and dust? Their hidden nature makes observing them a challenge, but our NuSTAR Satellite recently caught a glimpse of five of these supermassive black holes. More:

NASA Signs Scientific and Education Agreements with Brazil

Brazilian Space Agency (AEB) President José Raimundo Braga Coelho, left,  and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden sign agreements to further research into heliophysics and space weather and to enhance global climate study and educational opportunities, Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Brazilian Space Agency (AEB) President José Raimundo Braga Coelho, left, and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden sign agreements to further research into heliophysics and space weather and to enhance global climate study and educational opportunities, Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Brazilian Space Agency (AEB) President José Raimundo Braga Coelho have signed agreements to further research into heliophysics and space weather and to enhance global climate study and educational opportunities.

“I am delighted to expand our relationship with our long time exploration partner Brazil through these agreements,” Bolden said. “This partnership encompasses critical work not only to understand our planet, but also to help develop the leaders of tomorrow, and we look forward to many positive outcomes.”

“Brazil has an incredibly talented group of researchers and young people that are eager to participate in and enrich the unique scientific and educational opportunities that NASA affords,” Coelho said. “I am happy that the NASA-Brazil partnership continues to grow through these activities that promise to be fruitful for our two agencies and nations.”

Building on the Framework Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Federative Republic of Brazil on Cooperation in the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, the two space agencies finalized an implementing arrangement that will enable Brazil to acquire and process space weather data from NASA’s Van Allen Probes mission. In addition, the agreement enables Brazilian participation in missions studying the sun’s impacts on Earth’s space environment such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission.

Brazil also will now be the newest partner in the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program. The environmental science and education program brings together teachers, students and scientists to use Earth and space-based observations to study the global environment and promotes understanding of our planet as a system.

NASA and AEB also will partner to increase opportunities for Brazilian undergraduate and graduate students to participate in an internship at a NASA center through the NASA International Internship Program. The new agreement, signed separately by NASA and AEB on June 18 will provide a unique educational experience for Brazilian students while providing U.S. students an opportunity to work on international teams.

Atmospheric Escape Processes at Mars

Dave Brain—”MAVEN Measurements of Drivers, Response, and Escape

SWIA Science

In this presentation from June 20, 2015, Dr. David Brain, assistant professor of Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences – CU Boulder and MAVEN science team co-investigator, focuses on atmospheric escape processes at Mars during the second day of the 2015 ‪#‎MAVEN‬ New Media Professional Development Workshop.

The presentation and related discussion covered some of the early results from the nine instruments onboard the MAVEN spacecraft and the model predictions of what the early data indicate about Mars’ atmospheric and climate evolution.

View all of the videos from the workshop in one playlist, here:

(Video credit: Tom Mason/University of Colorado – LASP)

Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
‪#‎MAVENnm‬