ICON Payload Integration Time-Lapse


A 15-Week Time-Lapse in 2 Minutes

This time-lapse video shows the integration of instruments into the ICON payload at the Space Dynamics Laboratory in Logan, Utah. The video covers a 15-week period from mid-February, 2016 until the end of May, 2016. Occasional darkness indicates cleanliness inspections using a UV light, and the blue tower that is occasionally visible is the last tracker used for alignment measurements. The video begins with preparation of the Payload Interface Plate (PIP), with purge lines and the MIGHTI fiber optic assembly. The order of instrument integration is as follows: MIGHTI B, MIGHTI A, ICP-Echo, MIGHTI cal lamp, MIGHTI ebox, IVM A, EUV, FUV, IVM B, star tracker and antenna mast simulators, and ICP flight. The video ends with the payload moved from the handling cart to the shipping container base, ready for testing.  Read more about ICON.

NASA’s Deep Space Network, or DSN, “established a lock on the STEREO-B

Credit: NASA

Credit: NASA

NASA re-established contact with a wayward sun-watching science satellite Sunday nearly two years after the spacecraft suddenly dropped off line during a test, the agency said in a statement Monday.

NASA’s Deep Space Network, or DSN, “established a lock on the STEREO-B (spacecraft’s) downlink carrier at 6:27 p.m. EDT,” NASA said in a statement. “The downlink signal was monitored by the Mission Operations team over several hours to characterize the attitude of the spacecraft and then transmitter high voltage was powered down to save battery power.

“The STEREO Missions Operations team plans further recovery processes to assess observatory health, re-establish attitude control and evaluate all subsystems and instruments.”

The complete article courtesy of SpaceFlight Now:

2016 Novato Space Festival

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One of the best space memorabilia museums in the Bay Area will have its annual Space Festival on Saturday August 6th, from 10 AM to 4 PM. Come see both US and Russian memorabilia, from tools used in space, to garments worn by astronauts. There is also a Lunar Module and Lunar Rover on display. Five former astronauts will be on hand to give talks and meet and greet.

The best part of the 2016 Space Festival is that the event is free, that’s right no admission. Come join the fun and meet the astronauts who have flown in  space. More information can also be found here:

 

NASA Recruits Adventurous Kids For Mission To Mars

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BERKELEY (KPIX) – UC Berkeley space sciences professor Davin Larson is thinking about colonizing Mars. “I think it easily could happen — and will happen — in a thousand-year time scale,” Larson said.

NASA agrees with Larson and has published recruiting posters that encourage people to think about taking the ( at minimum) 30-million-mile trip to the Red Planet. NASA isn’t only looking for astrophysicists, geologists and engineers. The space agency is targeting average folks.

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“If man kind eventually wants to colonize Mars, you need all types of people. You don’t just need scientists. You need teachers, farmers, the garbage men — people who do everyday things on earth,” Larson said.

Even by NASA’s own predictions getting a human to Mars is still decades away, perhaps thirty years or so. Given that, most of us who are already working are too old. The ideal recruit is in second grade and that’s who NASA is aiming its promotion at.

“Kids now who don’t really know what they want to do, you’ve got to inspire them. I think these posters are good at inspiring,” Larson said.

When those Mars jobs are posted, we’ll let you know.

Anderson Post-Doc Travel Award Donation

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AndersonKinsey Anderson Post-Doc Travel Award is a program for providing travel funds for post-doctoral researchers at the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley has been established in honor of Professor Kinsey Anderson.

Professor Anderson, an early director and guiding figure behind the success of the Space Sciences Laboratory is pictured here.

Please consider making a donation to the fund.

A crescent Pluto shines like a jewel in the Kuiper Belt

This image, taken 15 minutes after the New Horizons spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto on July 14, reveals the distant world’s rugged terrain and atmospheric haze layers. This image, first published in early September, was re-released by NASA Thursday after further image progressing to bring out details. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

This image, taken 15 minutes after the New Horizons spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto on July 14, reveals the distant world’s rugged terrain and atmospheric haze layers. This image, first published in early September, was re-released by NASA Thursday after further image progressing to bring out details. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

A High Resolution version of the image

An image released Thursday, taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft minutes after zipping past Pluto in July, shows the backlit world on a new scale, revealing rugged mountains, glacial plains and deep layers of atmospheric haze.

It is an expanded version of a crescent view first released in September, according to NASA, showing an entire hemisphere of Pluto with silhouetted terrain on the night side of the dwarf planet at the left side of the image. Scientists also say the subtle shadow cast by Pluto on its tenuous atmosphere is visible near the top of the picture.

Alan Stern, the New Horizons mission’s principal investigator, called the picture “mouthwatering” on Twitter.

The complete story thanks to SpaceFlightNow

NASA’s Dr. John Grunsfeld visits the Space Sciences Lab

John M. Grunsfeld – Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA

In this image from March 2002, John M. Grunsfeld is shown in space shuttle Columbia's cargo bay. Credits: NASA

In this image from March 2002, John M. Grunsfeld is shown in space shuttle Columbia’s cargo bay.
Credits: NASA

John M. Grunsfeld, Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate

For Grunsfeld’s NASA astronaut and Science Mission Directoraten bio, visit.

The U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Lab was honored to have Dr. Grunsfeld spend some time touring our facility on August 21st, 2015. He is the third NASA dignitary to visit our lab, joining the ranks of NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Geoffrey Yoder, Associate Administrator for Programs.

Dr. Grunsfeld’s closest link to our lab was the installation of the COS, or Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, instrument into the Hubble Space Telescope, as part of the last Hubble Servicing Mission on STS-125. One half of the COS instrument, a EUV/FUV Detector and Electronics package was built here at SSL in conjunction with CASA at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He has flown on five shuttle missions, three of which were to service the Hubble Space Telescope.  He has logged over 58 days in space and almost as many hours on “space walks”.

Paul Turin presents the various instruments that were designed at SSL for NASA missions

Paul Turin presents the various instruments that were designed at SSL for NASA missions

Dan Werthimer discusses Stardust and the SETI programs

Dan Werthimer discusses Stardust and the SETI programs

The SSL FOXSI and COSI Sounding Rocket and Balloon Teams.

The SSL FOXSI and COSI Sounding Rocket and Balloon Teams.

Carolyn Kierans and the COSI Team present the new Balloon Gondola and Instrument packs

Carolyn Kierans and the COSI Team present the new Balloon Gondola and Instrument packs

Lindsay Glesner and Team present the FOXSI Sounding Rocket and plans for the next iteration

Lindsay Glesner and Team present the FOXSI Sounding Rocket and plans for the next iteration

Dr. Grunsfeld meets the NuSTAR Science Team

Dr. Grunsfeld meets the NuSTAR Science Team

John Grunsfeld and SSL employees

John Grunsfeld and SSL employees

Bill Craig and John Vallerga discuss ICON Mission Objectives

Bill Craig and John Vallerga discuss ICON Mission Objectives

Dr. Korpela and team detail the calibration efforts for EUV in the Bayside Chamber

Dr. Korpela and team detail the calibration efforts for EUV in the Bayside Chamber

 

Dr. Ossy Siegmund explains the sealed tube detectors to be used on the ICON mission

Dr. Ossy Siegmund explains the sealed tube detectors to be used on the ICON mission

Grunsfeld meets members of the ICON Team

Grunsfeld meets members of the ICON Team

Dr. Grunsfeld asks a thought provoking question

Dr. Grunsfeld asks a thought provoking question

Thomas Immel describing what the ICON project will study

Thomas Immel describing what the ICON project will study