MAVEN and UAE’s Hope mission will provide very powerful combination of Mars science measurements

 Sarah Amiri, deputy project manager of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Mars Mission, speaks during a ceremony to unveil the mission on May 6, 2015 in Dubai. The Hope mission aims to provide a global picture of the Martian atmosphere.  (Image credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Sarah Amiri, deputy project manager of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Mars Mission, speaks during a ceremony to unveil the mission on May 6, 2015 in Dubai. The Hope mission aims to provide a global picture of the Martian atmosphere.
(Image credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images

On May 7th, 2015 the University of Colorado announced a partnership agreement with the United Arab Emirates on a 2021 Mars Mission.

A mission to study dynamic changes in the atmosphere of Mars over days and seasons led by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) involves the University of Colorado Boulder as the leading U.S. scientific-academic partner.

The complete announcement, including The UAE’s U.S. scientific-academic partners also include the University of California, Berkeley, and Arizona State University, here.

MAVEN and UAE’s Hope mission will provide very powerful combination of Mars science measurements

In an interview with Forbes‪#‎MAVEN‬ principal investigator and Hope mission co-investigator, Bruce Jakosky, offered some insight into how the two missions will complement each other.

“The UAE Space Agency has been very consistent in that they don’t want to do a technology demonstration mission,” said Jakosky. “They want to contribute substantively to the world’s exploration and understanding of Mars.”

“The Hope science measurements will make a valuable contribution by themselves,” he added. “And if MAVEN is still operating when ‪#‎Hope‬ gets there, the combination will be very powerful.”

The complete article in Forbes is here.